Without a bit of sadness, through infrared filters, the land of death Chernobyl looked like paradise on another planet.

Vung dat chet Chernobyl hoa xu than tien qua ong kinh nhiep anh gia hinh anh 1

Vladimir Migutin, a Russian photographer, ventured into the Chernobyl restricted area in the city of Pripyat (Ukraine). His equipment includes an infrared camera of Kolari Vision.

Vung dat chet Chernobyl hoa xu than tien qua ong kinh nhiep anh gia hinh anh 2

Through the prism, the view of nearly 2,600 km2 around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant appeared strangely. More than 30 years after the radiation disaster, this place is empty of people. However, nature and animals continue to proliferate.

Vung dat chet Chernobyl hoa xu than tien qua ong kinh nhiep anh gia hinh anh 3

With the 590 nm infrared filter, Migutin recorded the surreal scene at Chernobyl. However, unlike many other sets of photographs that capture this area, the scene in his set is like heaven on another planet.

Pictures of Migutin show something quite new. In the abandoned landscape, things like things are emitting light that we don’t usually see.

His set of photos gives people hope for natural resilience as well as warning about the consequences of technology that can have a lasting impact on our planet.

Vung dat chet Chernobyl hoa xu than tien qua ong kinh nhiep anh gia hinh anh 12

Through the use of infrared images, Russian photographers help us visit the Chernobyl restricted area.

Vung dat chet Chernobyl hoa xu than tien qua ong kinh nhiep anh gia hinh anh 13

An abandoned farm in the area.

Vung dat chet Chernobyl hoa xu than tien qua ong kinh nhiep anh gia hinh anh 14

Parts of the machine were used to clean the roof of the reactor.

Vung dat chet Chernobyl hoa xu than tien qua ong kinh nhiep anh gia hinh anh 15

Huge rotation, 26 m high, iconic in the amusement park of Pripyat city.

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